Most people start to panic a little when they notice a lump of any kind on their body. Sometimes, men will worry that their enlarged male breasts are a possible indicator of breast cancer, which can affect men as well as women.

Fotolia_40195878_Subscription_Monthly_XLThere’s good news, though: gynecomastia in men is almost never a sign of male breast cancer, and will not lead to breast cancer. Why is this?

  • Gynecomastia is the overdevelopment of breast tissue and glands, not a tumor
  • Pseudogynecomastia is often characterized by excess fat
  • Gynecomastia is caused by a hormone imbalance, not by cancer cells
  • Breast cancer symptoms usually present in only one breast

How Many Men Develop Breast Cancer?

Only 1 man in 1,000 will develop breast cancer in his lifetime (as compared to 1 in 8 in women). How many men will develop gynecomastia, however? Approximately 1 in 10, not counting temporary gynecomastia.

When and Why Does Gynecomastia Develop?

There are three phases of life in which gynecomastia typically occurs.

Newborn babies usually have an excess of estrogen leftover from the mother’s body, which can lead to enlarged breasts during the first few weeks of life.

Adolescents, due to the hormonal imbalances caused by puberty, sometimes develop gynecomastia. This often disappears after a few years, but can be very damaging to self-confidence during this time.

Older men (starting about age 50) are at risk of gynecomastia due to hormonal changes or medications.

The best way to ease your mind about any changes in the breasts is to have a doctor physically examine them. From soreness to a lump or change in shape, a doctor should be involved. Thankfully, statistics say that 9 times out of 10 it will not be male breast cancer, it is still vital to get checked!

The Advanced Cosmetic Surgery Team has been successfully treating men with gynecomastia for many years.

Call our gynecomastia New York centers today for a free consultation. Our NYC gynecomastia office number is 212.206.0023 and our Long Island location number is 631.499.1831.

Sources:

  1. http://www.cancer.org/cancer/breastcancerinmen/detailedguide/breast-cancer-in-men-key-statistics
  2. http://www.cancer.org/cancer/breastcancerinmen/detailedguide/breast-cancer-in-men-what-is-breast-cancer-in-men